Broken Arrow Ranch Venison, Antelope, Wild Boar, Quail, Dorper Lamb
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Cooking Tips for Thick Cuts and Racks
of Wild Game


Thick cuts are those such as the chop ready rack or the boneless loin cooked whole for slicing instead of cutting into medallions before cooking.

Here at the ranch, we have developed a procedure for cooking thick cuts which works quite well. Remember that the objective is to put enough heat into the meat to reach a final internal temperature of 130° to 140° F for venison/antelope and 150° F for wild boar.

Start with a pan that can be used both on the stovetop and in the oven. A deep cast iron skillet is ideal. Preheat your oven to 300° F. Add one tablespoon of oil to the skillet and heat the oil over medium-high heat almost to the point where it begins smoking. When the oil is hot, place the meat in the pan and brown the meat thoroughly on all sides.

Remove the pan from the stove top and place in the center of the oven. Insert a meat thermometer in the center of the thickest part of the meat. As the meat cooks in the oven, check the meat thermometer. When the internal temperature reaches 120° to 125° F, remove the meat from the oven, leaving it uncovered in the pan. The internal temperature should continue to rise to 130° to 140° F over the next few minutes. If it does not, it may be necessary to put the pan back in the oven for a short additional time. For wild boar, pull the meat from the oven when it reaches 140° F to 145° F and the internal temperature will rise to 150° F.

Whole pieces of boneless loin or our boneless leg meat for medallions should be allowed to "rest" for 10 to 15 minutes after removal from the oven and then thinly sliced across the grain. The slices should be no more than 1/4 inch thick and should be "fanned out" across the plate for an attractive presentation. The meat slices can be placed on a bed of an appropriate sauce or can be served with the sauce around the sides of the slices. We encourage you to avoid pouring sauce over the meat. It can overwhelm the delicate flavor and hide the beautiful pink color of the meat.